Friday, September 17, 2021

DEP Posts 59 Pages Of Permit-Related Notices In Sept. 18 PA Bulletin

The Department of Environmental Protection published 59 pages of public notices related to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the September 18 PA Bulletin -
pages 6052 - 6111.
Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice: Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit applications submitted in your community?  Notice of new technical guidance documents and regulations?  All through its eNotice system.  Click Here to sign up.
For more information on environmental programs in Pennsylvania, visit DEP’s website, Click Here to sign up for DEP’s newsletter, sign up for DEP Connects events, sign up for DEP’s eNotice, visit DEP’s BlogLike DEP on Facebook, Follow DEP on Twitter and visit DEP’s YouTube Channel.
Related Articles:
[Posted: September 17, 2021] PA Environment Digest

Stroud Hosts Major Events: Wild & Scenic Film Festival Sept. 24; Water’s Edge Gala- Award Presentation Nov. 4; Intersection Of Art & Science Storyteller Carolyn Finney Nov. 18

The
Stroud Water Research Center in Chester County will host a series of events this fall of interest to a wide variety of audiences.

Wild & Scenic Film Festival Sept. 24

On September 24 will host the 14th Annual Wild and Scenic Film at the Brandywine Red Clay Alliance’s Myrick Conservation Center, 1760 Unionville-Wawaset Rd, West Chester starting at 5:00 p.m.

Films will also be available online for five days starting September 24.

This event is hosted by Trail Creek Outfitters to benefit the Stroud Center, The Land Conservancy for Southern Chester County, and Brandywine Red Clay Alliance.

Click Here for tickets and more information.

Water’s Edge Gala- Award Presentation Nov. 4

Join other celebrants attending the Water’s Edge Gala on November 4 as the Stroud Center presents this year’s Award for Freshwater Excellence to Melissa Ho, Ph.D., senior vice president for fresh water and food at the World Wildlife Fund-U.S.

The Gala will be held at The Stone Barn, 100 Stone Barn Dr. in Kennett Square.

Click Here for tickets and more information.

Intersection of Art & Science Nov. 18

Join Stroud for a lecture by Carolyn Finney, Ph.D., a storyteller, author, and cultural geographer deeply interested in issues related to identity, difference, creativity, and resilience.

Carolyn is grounded in both artistic and intellectual ways of knowing-- she pursued an acting career for eleven years, but five years of backpacking trips through Africa and Asia and living in Nepal changed the course of her life. 

Motivated by these experiences, Carolyn returned to school after a 15-year absence to complete a B.A., M.A. (gender and environmental issues in Kenya and Nepal), and Ph.D. (where she was a Fulbright and a Canon National Science Scholar Fellow).

This special program will be held November 18 at the Stroud Water Research Center, 970 Spencer Road in Avondale.

Click Here for more information.

Other Highlights From Stroud Newsletter

-- Stroud Center Engages English Language Learners In Watershed STEM

-- Lancaster Farming: A Riparian Buffer Takes Root In Lancaster County

-- Scientists Explore Power Of Hemp, Better Farming Methods To Build Healthy Soils

-- Marathoner Nicole Wickenhauser Poised To Protect Clean Fresh Water

-- Webinar: Leaf Pack Thru The Ages: Monitoring With Students From Middle School To College

-- Stories From The Clean Water Paddle Push

-- Stroud Employment Opportunities: Part-Time Educators

Click Here to read the entire Stroud newsletter.

For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the Stroud Water Research Center website, Click Here to subscribe to UpStream.  Click Here to subscribe to Stroud’s Educator newsletter.  Click Here to become a Friend Of Stroud Research,  Like them on Facebook, Follow on Twitter and visit their YouTube Channel.

The Chester County-based Stroud Center seeks to advance knowledge and stewardship of freshwater systems through global research, education, and watershed restoration.


(Reprinted from the latest Stroud Water Research Center newsletter.  Click Here to sign up for your own copy.)

Related Article:

-- Stroud Water Research Center: Engages English Language Learners In Watershed STEM

[Posted: September 17, 2021]  PA Environment Digest

Stroud Water Research Center Engages English Language Learners In Watershed STEM

Stroud Water Research Center educators made a splash (well, virtually anyway) this summer with the Migrant Education Summer Camp at the Technical College High School Pennock’s Bridge Campus in Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

Students participated in an online watershed expedition to learn more about their local watersheds, conduct a stream study at a local park, identify issues in their watershed, and develop potential solutions to address the issues they discovered. 

This watershed STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) program by the Stroud Center through an eeBLUE grant seeks to develop students’ environmental literacy and leadership skills as they improve their communities. 

With support from the U.S. Department of Education, eeBLUE-- a collaboration between the North American Association for Environmental Education and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration--  was able to award $2.45 million to 30 environmental education organizations to provide enriching watershed-related STEM programs at 100 Nita M. Lowey 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLCs) throughout the United States.  

Participants ranged from sixth through 12th grade and were primarily English language learners, many of whom speak Mayan dialects and are learning Spanish to learn English. 

Stroud Center Assistant Research Scientist Diana Oviedo-Vargas, Ph.D., who is a native Spanish speaker from Costa Rica, assisted in the delivery of the chemistry stream study activity.

“We were really excited and honored to be awarded an eeBLUE grant,” said project manager David Kline, a watershed education specialist at the Stroud Center. “This is an incredible opportunity to engage students who live in high-poverty and underserved areas in meaningful, place-based, watershed learning and inspire the next generation of stewards of our communities and environment.”

“Our goal was to take participants outside and open their eyes and minds to the hidden jewels of our watersheds,” said Kline, “but the COVID-19 pandemic threw a monkey wrench into the mix that forced the entire grant program to pivot and recreate outdoor learning experiences in a virtual environment.” 

So Stroud Center educators spent the first year piloting online activities in outside-of-school and summer camp sites in Coatesville, Oxford, and Avon Grove. 

“While virtual activities were not part of the original plan,” said Kline, “we were able to test some new approaches for traditionally in-person activities and develop some new tools to improve the experience for the participants.” 

Some of the pilot activities went really well, while others really fell flat. One adaptation that was very effective was incorporating videos of local waterways. Participants were much more engaged when they saw locations in their community that they recognized and had visited in person.      

This summer’s program focused on a stretch of the east branch of White Clay Creek (just a few miles downstream from the Stroud Center) that flows along a local park in Avondale. 

Kline and Mandy Nix, also a watershed education specialist at the Stroud Center, spent hours filming the location to provide images and videos of the park, the water in the stream, and the critters that call this creek home. 

They filmed a complete assessment of the stream that included habitat, chemical, physical, and biological assessments.      

“We know the water quality of the east branch of White Clay Creek is excellent around the Stroud Center, but it was interesting to compare our results of a stream study just a few miles downstream,” said Kline. 

The overall water quality was still good, but deterioration was noted, including a reduction in the number of species of macroinvertebrates and the presence of materials dumped by humans (both large items and litter). 

As the summer camp program progressed, the participants learned more about watersheds and the impacts that humans can have on streams, both good and bad. 

The main issue the students discovered was the amount of litter that occurs at James Watson Memorial Park on a regular basis.      

Students in the summer camp helped to brainstorm ideas on how to prevent littering and encourage all citizens to make a difference in their communities.      

The highlight of the program came after the last session ended. 

The Stroud Center accepted an invitation to participate in a Parents and Family Open House at the Pennock’s Bridge Campus. Kline and Oveido-Vargas were on hand to showcase the programs and tools that scientists use to monitor water quality in creeks and rivers. 

“We had two tables, an EnviroDIY Monitoring Station, chemical testing kits, and live macroinvertebrates from a local creek,” said Kline. “The families were blown away when they saw the macros move and were able to see details through microscopes, such as a mayfly wiggling its abdominal gills to increase dissolved oxygen intake.” 

“We are looking forward to the opportunity to host in-person programs with our partner sites in the next year and return to in-person outdoor learning experiences rather than virtual recreations,” said Kline.

For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the Stroud Water Research Center website, Click Here to subscribe to UpStream.  Click Here to subscribe to Stroud’s Educator newsletter.  Click Here to become a Friend Of Stroud Research,  Like them on Facebook, Follow on Twitter and visit their YouTube Channel.

The Chester County-based Stroud Center seeks to advance knowledge and stewardship of freshwater systems through global research, education, and watershed restoration.


(Reprinted from the latest Stroud Water Research Center newsletter.  Click Here to sign up for your own copy.)

Related Article:

-- Stroud: Hosts Major Events: Wild & Scenic Film Festival Sept. 24; Water’s Edge Gala- Award Presentation Nov. 4; Intersection Of Art & Science Storyteller Carolyn Finney Nov. 18

[Posted: September 17, 2021]  PA Environment Digest

Gov. Wolf Encourages Individuals Impacted By Ida To Register For Disaster Assistance; Business Owner Help Available Thru Virtual SBA Recovery Center

On September 17, Gov. Tom Wolf reminded individuals who suffered property damage or loss as a direct result of the remnants of Ida to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and apply for disaster assistance. 
Read more here.

Assistance is also available to business owners through the Small Business Administration.  Help is available through the SBA virtual Business Recovery Center by sending email to: FOCWAssistance@sba.gov or calling (916) 735-1500.  Read more here.

“This powerful storm caused severe flooding and spawned numerous rare tornadoes, which left homeowners and communities devastated. That’s why my administration worked swiftly to get approval for federal disaster aid,” Gov. Wolf said. “Disaster assistance is now available so I encourage everyone who was directly impacted by this storm to register today. I also want to thank FEMA and our own Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency for working so quickly to help those who greatly need it.” 

Impacted residents of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, Philadelphia or York counties should register with FEMA online at disasterassistance.gov, through the FEMA app, or by calling the FEMA Helpline at 1-800-621-FEMA (3362), or TTY 1-800-462-7585. Helpline services are available seven days a week from 7:00 AM to 1:00 AM ET. 

FEMA also has Disaster Survivor Assistance (DSA) Teams deployed to provide hands-on assistance with registration and to answer questions. 

The disaster assistance is a result of Gov. Wolf’s successful request to President Biden to declare a major disaster in Pennsylvania following heavy rainfall, severe flash flooding, and tornadoes from the remnants of Ida that impacted Pennsylvania on August 31, 2021, through September 5, 2021. 

The major disaster declaration through FEMA will provide federal funding and services to eligible individuals and households in the affected counties through the Individual Assistance Program and impacted communities in all 67 counties through the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program

Individuals with insurance should first file a claim; those who are uninsured or underinsured should register as soon as possible. 

Federal assistance will help with basic needs, including assistance to make essential home repairs, find a temporary place to stay, and repair or replace certain household items. Individuals should also document all damage and keep receipts for any repair work.  

For more information about FEMA’s support to Pennsylvania’s recovery is available online.

[Posted: September 17, 2021]  PA Environment Digest

Sept. 17 Take Five Fridays With Pam Now Available From PA Parks & Forests Foundation

The
September 17 Take Five Fridays With Pam is now available from the PA Parks & Forests Foundation.

Lots of information about what happened last week in state parks and forests and what’s coming up this week for you to enjoy!

Click Here to read the entire Take Five.

For more information on programs, initiatives, special events and how you can get involved, visit the PA Parks & Forests Foundation website.  Click Here to sign up for regular updates from the Foundation,  Like them on Facebook or Follow them on Twitter or tune in to their YouTube ChannelClick Here to become a member of the Foundation.

The Foundation and their 46 chapters mobilize 65,000 volunteers annually to steward YOUR state parks and forests.

(Photo: Linn Run State Park, Westmoreland County by Discover the Burgh.)

NewsClips:

-- AltoonaM: Volunteer Greg Williams Is ‘Heartbeat’ Of Rail Trail 

-- TribLive: Laurel Highlands Ranks 8th In USA Today’s Top-10 Fall Foliage Spots; PA’s Pocono Mountains Was 3rd

-- PennLive - Marcus Schneck: Top Fall Foliage Spots In PA From People Who Developed The National Map

-- PennLive - Marcus Schneck: PA’s Fall Foliage Expected To Bring Vibrant Colors, Accuweather

-- PennLive - Marcus Schneck: PA Has 2 Spots In Top 10 Fall Foliage Destinations In U.S.

-- PG - John Hayes: Lake Erie Paints Erie’s Leaves In Unique Colors In Autumn

-- PA Environmental Council: Getting Their Feet Wet - First Waves River Surfing Program

-- PA Environmental Council: Celebrating PA’s 2021 River Of The Year - The Shenango River

-- CentreDT: Vistas And View Waiting For You Along Allegheny Front Trail In Centre County

-- ReadingE: New Schuylkill River Access Opens In Perry Twp., Berks County

-- Patch: Major Extension Of Chester Valley Trail To Link To Schuylkill River Trail

-- ErieT: Dedication Of End Of Trail Linking Erie To Pittsburgh Set For Sept. 19 At Dobbins Landing

-- MCall: Lehigh Valley Section Of Appalachian Trail Moving To Its Original Location 

-- WillliamsportS: All-Inclusive Playground Dedicated In Williamsport

-- WilliamsportS Editorial: Accessible Play Worth The Cost, Opens Door To Joy

Related Articles:

-- DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council: Meets Sept. 22 On Emergency Preparedness; Oct. 27 Economics And The Outdoors Discussion 

-- DCNR: State Park Visitation Down From The Record 2020, But Still 3.9 Million Ahead Of 2019; Fall Foliage Reports To Begin Soon 

-- DCNR Blog: Conservation Landscapes - Spotlight On Lehigh Valley Greenways 

-- DCNR: Statewide ‘Walk With A Doc’ Campaign Promotes Health And Nature

-- South Mountain Partnership: September - October Walk & Talk Speakers Series  

-- WeConservePA: Sept. 28 - Understanding Funding Opportunities Thru The American Rescue Plan 

-- WeConservePA: Oct. 14 Diversity, Equity, Inclusion And Justice Training Webinar  

[Posted: September 17, 2021]  PA Environment Digest

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